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World Wildlife Fund

Make the Most of Your
Retirement Plan Assets

Support Our Work and Minimize Taxes

Did you know that retirement accounts are subject to federal income taxes that could be as much as 37 percent upon your death? The good news is that these taxes can be eliminated or reduced through a carefully planned charitable gift.

Consider leaving your loved ones less heavily taxed assets and leaving your retirement plan assets to World Wildlife Fund to support our work. As a nonprofit organization, WWF is a tax-exempt organization and will receive the full amount of what you designate to us from your plan. You can take advantage of this gift opportunity in several ways, illustrated on the following pages.

Retirement Plan Assets

3 Ways to Donate Your Retirement Account

1

List WWF as a beneficiary of your account.
The simplest way to leave the balance of a retirement account to World Wildlife Fund after your lifetime is to list WWF as the beneficiary on the form provided by your plan administrator. If you are married, your spouse must sign a written waiver.

2

Make WWF a contingent beneficiary.
If you prefer to make your spouse the primary beneficiary of your retirement account, you can name World Wildlife Fund as the contingent beneficiary. Want your children to benefit, too? Designate a specific amount for WWF with the remainder for your children.

3

Give from your IRA.
If you are 70½ years old or older, you can take advantage of a simple way to help support WWF's conservation work and receive tax benefits in return. You can give any amount up to $100,000 from your IRA directly to a qualified charity such as World Wildlife Fund, and the distribution will not be subject to US federal income tax.

Retirement Plan Assets

Example: Tax-Smart Planning

A longtime donor with a $1.5 million estate wants to leave World Wildlife Fund a gift valued at $750,000. They also want to leave something to their only daughter who is in the 32 percent federal income tax bracket. Take a look at the options.

Option 1: Our donor divides assets equally between the daughter and WWF.

Daughter Us
IRA $375,000 $375,000
Other assets (house, securities, cash) $375,000 $375,000
Federal income tax owed ($120,000) ($0)
Net amount to beneficiary after taxes $630,000 $750,000

Option 2: Our donor names WWF the beneficiary of retirement plan assets and leaves the daughter all other assets.

Daughter Us
IRA $0 $750,000
Other assets (house, securities, cash) $750,000 $0
Federal income tax owed ($0) ($0)
Net amount to beneficiary after taxes $750,000 $750,000
Retirement Plan Assets

Next Steps

For more information, please seek guidance from an estate planning attorney, a CPA, or other tax professional. We would be happy to answer any questions regarding charitable giving that you or your advisors may have. Feel free to contact us at no obligation.

Office of Gift Planning
Phone: 888-993-9455
Email: legacygifts@wwfus.org
1250 24th Street, NW
Washington, DC 20037

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Retirement Plan Assets

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Someone from World Wildlife Fund will be in contact with you soon. If you need to speak to us immediately, please call us at 888-993-9455.